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Old 09-09-2010, 17:03   #1
draggar
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Default Did I translate correctly (to Czech)?(Has gone OT but I don't mind)

I took a stab at it using some online tools and I ended up with:

Vlkhrad

Anyone who speaks Czech know if I did it correctly? (Re-translate into English to take a guess!).

Last edited by draggar; 09-09-2010 at 19:12.
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:21   #2
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Vlkhrad is noncens. You wrote wolfcastle. It is nothing in czech language. If you mean castle where are wolves or castle of wolves (wolves are owners of castle ), you must write "vlčí hrad". It is two words.
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:27   #3
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I meant it as the name of the place, "Wolf's Castle" (like a town name) and the international characters aren't accepted.
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:29   #4
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So I wrote it right: Vlčí hrad
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:31   #5
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It took the accented i but not the c character (I can't even find it on my ASCII chart - copy and paste won't work, that character disappears). So I ended up with:

Vlcí hrad

Sorry us Americans are butchering your language.

Edit: I think this is a language I may want to learn some of, it looks like I could get some good (and very secure) passwords from it!

Maybe I'll get the package listed on here:

http://www.amazon.com/EuroTalk-Inter.../dp/B00117P3W6

(The software and book listed about 1/3 the way down - I'll skip out on the map since I'm not planning on going to Prague anytime soon!).

Last edited by draggar; 09-09-2010 at 17:38.
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:39   #6
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To learn it???Hmmm. The foreigners tell, it is very dificult language like chinesse language .
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Old 09-09-2010, 17:53   #7
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They say that about English, too (but we have all these rules, exceptions to the rules, and even exceptions to the exceptions, take the word weird for example).

I have seen some vlcak paperwork so I'm under the impression the language doesn't like vowels too much?

BTW - what is the Czech language based on? It doesn't seem Latin based like Spanish, French, and Italian and it doesn't seem Germanic based like German and English.

Maybe Russian based, or a combination of languages (like Creole)?

Last edited by draggar; 09-09-2010 at 17:56.
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Old 09-09-2010, 18:50   #8
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Czech language is west slavic language, most related to slovakian, poland and srbian language. Czech language is in group of slavic languages, indo- european. It beginned in cca 10. century.
hi hi, sorry about my explanation in english, my english is bad....But I hope you understand something...
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Old 09-09-2010, 19:11   #9
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Your English is better than some of the native-English speakers I deal with on a daily basis.

Thank you for the explination. So it seems like a language that is based in (and from) eastern Europe?

I would like to go there someday, maybe if my wife and I can afford Fred Lanting's sieger tour we could convince him to make a stop in the Czech Republic (the country has a fascinating histoy, especially late 20th century, too).
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Old 09-09-2010, 19:25   #10
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Yes, eastern Europe. When I travel to Slovakia, I understand everything. When I travel to Russian and Poland, I understand, but not all. When I travel to Croatia, Serbian, I understand only a little.
When you will travel to czech, visit me
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Old 09-09-2010, 19:33   #11
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I'm sure if we go my wife will want to meet some vlcak breeders (especially ones where our Luna is descendant from). When my wife went to Belgum to import a GSD she made sure she got to meet our GSD's (Kiri) breeder.

Maybe we can convince Fred to take an extra trip to the Czech Republic with us when we can afford to go there. Since we got into the breed he's been interested in it and we've asked him if he'd like to be a judge for our breed (since he's all breed certified in UKC).

I think he's doing his Sieger tour now (or maybe just a month long trip to Europe?) so it may be a couple of years before we can afford it.

As for the languages - it's the same with Spanish (which I know some). Listening is hard to understand but if I'm reading French or Italian I can get a basic understanding of what I'm reading.

Last edited by draggar; 09-09-2010 at 19:41.
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Old 10-09-2010, 08:12   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by draggar View Post
They say that about English, too
Really? I was always told that English was the easiest language to learn for foreigners. And I think it may by true comparing it with e.g. Polish or Russian.
(I live in Poland and Polish is my native language).
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Old 10-09-2010, 13:26   #13
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Really? I was always told that English was the easiest language to learn for foreigners. And I think it may by true comparing it with e.g. Polish or Russian.
(I live in Poland and Polish is my native language).
I think it's probably all relative to your first language. I'd guess English would be easy in comparison to Polish (a good portion of my family are Polish immigrants, and they've all picked up on the language quickly and easily) but it would probably be difficult for someone who speaks a more "logical" language like Spanish.
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Old 10-09-2010, 17:47   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicky View Post
I think it's probably all relative to your first language. I'd guess English would be easy in comparison to Polish (a good portion of my family are Polish immigrants, and they've all picked up on the language quickly and easily) but it would probably be difficult for someone who speaks a more "logical" language like Spanish.
That's actually what I've heard, is that it definitely depends on your native language and the complexity and rules of that language. I've always wants to learn another (or maybe multiple) language(s) but all I know other than English is Spanish thanks to high school.
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Old 10-09-2010, 19:00   #15
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Grammatically, Chinese is extremely easy, with syntax very reminiscent of English, surprisingly. But it's the memorization of the character based system that is the most difficult, even to native speakers. And for foreigners the sounds can be difficult too.

Japanese imho from knowing both natively is more difficult because of its mixed historical background and need for conjugation..which doesn't exist in chinese. But the pronunciation is much easier.
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Old 10-09-2010, 19:01   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukidomari View Post
But it's the memorization of the character based system that is the most difficult, even to native speakers.
Isn't that what the "international alphabet" is for?
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Old 10-09-2010, 19:08   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by draggar View Post
Isn't that what the "international alphabet" is for?
I wouldn't know...when I see romanized Chinese, 90% of the time I can't understand it...

gotta understand that Chinese is made up of single syllable words..so yes, there's about a million meanings to any single sound..only through context and character differences so you know which it means..
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Old 10-09-2010, 19:29   #18
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You mean like there, their, and they're?

Two, to, and too?

Bow, bow, and bow?

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Old 10-09-2010, 19:45   #19
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[quote=draggar;323366]You mean like there, their, and they're?

Two, to, and too?

Bow, bow, and bow?

Yes, exactly!!
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Old 10-09-2010, 20:33   #20
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In the past I used to teach both Polish and English to foreigners of many nationalities. I may assure you that English is much easier to be learnt for communicative purposes than any Slavic language

Finnish/Hungarian/Estonian seem to be more difficult as far a grammar is concerned, Russian/Bulgarian/Greek - for a different (Cyrillic) alphabet.

Maybe Nebulosa should act expert? Her English and Polish have improved significantly over the last couple of years.
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